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What:
World War II, Italian Co-Belligerent Air Force
Aircraft: Junkers Ju-87D-3, Stuka of Nucleo Volo Stormo Trasporti (NVST-1)
Roundel: Aeronautica Militare Italiana (Allies)
Tail number: N.V.S.T 1
Serial: MM100 ? 10

Where:
Italy

When:
Circa 1944

References:
www.wardrawings.be
wp.scn.ru
www.italie1935-45.com

Who:
Lieutenant Donald N. McHenry, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), Fifteenth Air Force, 5th Photo Group Recon, 32nd Photo Recon Squadron, Photo Lab Tech, Squadron Section Chief–Photo Lab

“Lt. McHenry” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

What:
World War II, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), captured German Luftwaffe bomber
Aircraft: Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433)
Tail number: 8433
Marked: 2B+DC and “Red 4”

Where:
San Severo, Italy

When:
“December 9, 1944” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

References:
silverhawkauthor.com : “Surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944. This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600. It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.”

Perhaps the “most serious enemy incursion” of our perimeter was the appearance of a German Heinkel 111 flying over our base one warm lazy afternoon near the war’s end. The pilot circled, requested and was granted permission to land. As Intelligence officer, Lowitt commandeered a car and with Capt. Pappy Gedney rushed to “meet the enemy.” The plane rolled to a stop and with hands held high the pilot, a Hungarian (enemy) officer, who had defected, stepped from the plane. With him was his wife, child and another civilian male. The prisoners were held in squadron quarters until the M.P.’s took the prisoners to Foggia. Pappy Gedney relieved the prisoners of their weapons—but we never knew what happened to the Heinkel. Only now [1994] after our first reunion have we learned from Dale E. Baird, Jr. (Officers Mess) that the German Bomber is on display at the museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. (Albert J. Ostergaard, Eyes Over Europe: The 32nd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron of San Severo, Italy, 1944–1945, Ellisville, MO, 1996, 35.)

Who:

Lieutenant Donald N. McHenry, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), Fifteenth Air Force, 5th Photo Group Recon, 32nd Photo Recon Squadron, Photo Lab Tech, Squadron Section Chief–Photo Lab

“Lt. McHenry” (handwritten on back of photo)

What:
World War II, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), captured German Luftwaffe bomber
Aircraft: Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433)
Tail number: 8433
Marked: 2B+DC and “Red 4”

Where:
San Severo, Italy

When:
“December 9, 1944” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

References:
silverhawkauthor.com : “Surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944. This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600. It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.”

Perhaps the “most serious enemy incursion” of our perimeter was the appearance of a German Heinkel 111 flying over our base one warm lazy afternoon near the war’s end. The pilot circled, requested and was granted permission to land. As Intelligence officer, Lowitt commandeered a car and with Capt. Pappy Gedney rushed to “meet the enemy.” The plane rolled to a stop and with hands held high the pilot, a Hungarian (enemy) officer, who had defected, stepped from the plane. With him was his wife, child and another civilian male. The prisoners were held in squadron quarters until the M.P.’s took the prisoners to Foggia. Pappy Gedney relieved the prisoners of their weapons—but we never knew what happened to the Heinkel. Only now [1994] after our first reunion have we learned from Dale E. Baird, Jr. (Officers Mess) that the German Bomber is on display at the museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. (Albert J. Ostergaard, Eyes Over Europe: The 32nd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron of San Severo, Italy, 1944–1945, Ellisville, MO, 1996, 35.)

Who:
Lieutenant Donald N. McHenry, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), Fifteenth Air Force, 5th Photo Group Recon, 32nd Photo Recon Squadron, Photo Lab Tech, Squadron Section Chief–Photo Lab

“Lt. McHenry” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

What:
World War II, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), captured German Luftwaffe bomber
Aircraft: Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433)
Tail number: 8433
Marked: 2B+DC and “Red 4”

Where:
San Severo, Italy

When:
“December 9, 1944” (handwritten on back of photo)

References:
silverhawkauthor.com : “Surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944. This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600. It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.”

Who:
Lieutenant Donald N. McHenry, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), Fifteenth Air Force, 5th Photo Group Recon, 32nd Photo Recon Squadron, Photo Lab Tech, Squadron Section Chief–Photo Lab

“Lt. McHenry” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

What:
World War II, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), captured German Luftwaffe bomber
Aircraft: Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433)
Tail number: 8433
Marked: 2B+DC and “Red 4”

Where:
San Severo, Italy

When:
“December 9, 1944” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

References:
silverhawkauthor.com : “Surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944. This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600. It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.”

Perhaps the “most serious enemy incursion” of our perimeter was the appearance of a German Heinkel 111 flying over our base one warm lazy afternoon near the war’s end. The pilot circled, requested and was granted permission to land. As Intelligence officer, Lowitt commandeered a car and with Capt. Pappy Gedney rushed to “meet the enemy.” The plane rolled to a stop and with hands held high the pilot, a Hungarian (enemy) officer, who had defected, stepped from the plane. With him was his wife, child and another civilian male. The prisoners were held in squadron quarters until the M.P.’s took the prisoners to Foggia. Pappy Gedney relieved the prisoners of their weapons—but we never knew what happened to the Heinkel. Only now [1994] after our first reunion have we learned from Dale E. Baird, Jr. (Officers Mess) that the German Bomber is on display at the museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. (Albert J. Ostergaard, Eyes Over Europe: The 32nd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron of San Severo, Italy, 1944–1945, Ellisville, MO, 1996, 35.)

Who:
Lieutenant Donald N. McHenry, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), Fifteenth Air Force, 5th Photo Group Recon, 32nd Photo Recon Squadron, Photo Lab Tech, Squadron Section Chief–Photo Lab

“Lt. McHenry” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

What:
World War II, United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), captured German Luftwaffe bomber
Aircraft: Heinkel He 111H-16, (Wk. Nr. 8433)
Tail number: 8433
Marked: 2B+DC and “Red 4”

Where:
San Severo, Italy

When:
“December 9, 1944” (handwritten on back of 3rd photo)

References:
silverhawkauthor.com : “Surrendered in Italy by a defecting Hungarian pilot in Dec 1944. This aircraft was shipped to the USA where it was designated USA FE-1600, later T2-1600. It was probably scrapped at Freeman Field, Indiana in 1946.”

Perhaps the “most serious enemy incursion” of our perimeter was the appearance of a German Heinkel 111 flying over our base one warm lazy afternoon near the war’s end. The pilot circled, requested and was granted permission to land. As Intelligence officer, Lowitt commandeered a car and with Capt. Pappy Gedney rushed to “meet the enemy.” The plane rolled to a stop and with hands held high the pilot, a Hungarian (enemy) officer, who had defected, stepped from the plane. With him was his wife, child and another civilian male. The prisoners were held in squadron quarters until the M.P.’s took the prisoners to Foggia. Pappy Gedney relieved the prisoners of their weapons—but we never knew what happened to the Heinkel. Only now [1994] after our first reunion have we learned from Dale E. Baird, Jr. (Officers Mess) that the German Bomber is on display at the museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio. (Albert J. Ostergaard, Eyes Over Europe: The 32nd Photo Reconnaissance Squadron of San Severo, Italy, 1944–1945, Ellisville, MO, 1996, 35.)

What:
World War II
Aircraft: German Luftwaffe
Marked: W

Where:
San Severo, Italy


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